Algorithms in Java, Parts 1-4 (3rd Edition) by Robert Sedgewick

By Robert Sedgewick

Represents the fundamental first 1/2 Sedgewick's whole paintings. Its 4 components: basics, info buildings, sorting, and looking. Appeals both to either the educational markets. Softcover.

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We recommend the latest version of Microsoft Visual Studio. • 32-Bit Debugger: Strictly speaking, you don’t need a debugger, but you will probably want one. The debugger supplied with Microsoft Visual Studio is excellent. What Types of Programs Will I Create? This book shows how to create two general classes of programs: • 16-Bit Real-Address Mode: 16-bit real-address mode programs run under MS-DOS and in the console window under MS-Windows. Also known as real mode programs, they use a segmented memory model required of programs written for the Intel 8086 and 8088 processors.

The C and C++ languages use nullterminated strings, and many DOS and Windows functions require strings to be in this format. Using the ASCII Table A table on the inside back cover of this book lists ASCII codes used when running in MS-DOS mode. To find the hexadecimal ASCII code of a character, look along the top row of the table and find the column containing the character you want to translate. The most significant digit of the hexadecimal value is in the second row at the top of the table; the least significant digit is in the second column from the left.

ASCII Strings A sequence of one or more characters is called a string. More specifically, an ASCII string is stored in memory as a succession of bytes containing ASCII codes. For example, the numeric codes for the string “ABC123” are 41h, 42h, 43h, 31h, 32h, and 33h. A null-terminated string is a string of characters followed by a single byte containing zero. The C and C++ languages use nullterminated strings, and many DOS and Windows functions require strings to be in this format. Using the ASCII Table A table on the inside back cover of this book lists ASCII codes used when running in MS-DOS mode.

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